Qu'est-ce qui + [verb] = What [does]...

Look at these two questions asking What in English:

What are you doing?     
-> "you" is doing "what"; here "what" is the object of the action

What is making that noise?
-> "What" is doing the action of making the noise; it's the subject, the "acting" element of the sentence
In the first case, you can use qu'est-ce que, que or quoi in French:
Qu'est-ce que tu fais ? 
Que fais-tu ?
Tu fais quoi ?
See Questions with qui, que, quoi, quand, où, comment, pourquoi, combien

BUT
In the second case, you will only be able to use qu'est-ce qui + [verb clause]:
Qu'est-ce qui fait ce bruit ?

Look at these other examples:

Qu'est-ce qui s'est passé ?What happened?

Qu'est-ce qui t'a pris autant de temps ?What took you so long?

Qu'est-ce qui fait ce bruit ?What is making that noise?

Qu'est-ce qui sent si mauvais ?What smells so bad?

Qu'est-ce qui te prend ?What's got into you?
[Literally: What is taking you?]


You will find this structure with a lot of "reversed" expressions, such plaire, manquer, etc...

Qu'est-ce qui te manque le plus ?What do you miss the most?

Qu'est-ce qui te plaît chez Anna ?What do you like about Anna?

Want to make sure your French sounds confident? We’ll map your knowledge and give you free lessons to focus on your gaps and mistakes. Start your Braimap today »

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Qu'est-ce qui t'a pris autant de temps ?What took you so long?
Qu'est-ce qui te manque le plus ?What do you miss the most?
Qu'est-ce qui sent si mauvais ?What smells so bad?
Qu'est-ce qui te prend ?What's got into you?
[Literally: What is taking you?]
Qu'est-ce qui fait ce bruit ?What is making that noise?
Qu'est-ce qui te plaît chez Anna ?What do you like about Anna?
Qu'est-ce qui s'est passé ?What happened?
How has your day been?