Questions with qui, que, quoi, quand, où, comment, pourquoi, combien

In the most basic form of questions these question words can be used:

qui who
que/quoi what
quand when
where
comment how
pourquoi why
combien how much

Let's see the three ways to use them:

 

1. Use intonation with a normal statement

In that very simple case, most of the time question words would be at the end of the statement, but they can also sometimes be at the beginning of the statement.
The question will be marked with a querying tone (or in written form with a question mark):

Comment tu vas ?
How are you?

Tu vas comment ?
How are you?

C'est qui ?
Who is it?

C'est quoi ?
What is it?

Note that what can only be at the end of the sentence, and you use quoi and NOT que.

Note that in who [does] questions, qui [fait] will always be at the beginning, but in other cases, qui (whom or who is it) can be at either place.

See Questions: Qui, qui est-ce qui = Who ? and Questions: Qui / qui est-ce que = Whom ?.

 

2. With est-ce que...

You will place the question word before est-ce que followed by the statement in a normal order. This is a common way to start a question:

est-ce que tu vas ?
Where are you going?

Quand est-ce que vous quittez Chicago?
When do you leave Chicago?

Combien est-ce que ça coûte?
How much does it cost?

Qu'est-ce qu'elle veut faire?
What does she want to do?

-> Note that in this last case, que becomes qu' because it's in front of a vowel.

 

3. Use the "inverted question" form

You use the question word at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the inverted verb and then the subject. it is a more elegant way to ask questions:

Qui est-ce ?
Who is it?

Pourquoi ont-ils des rayures ?
Why have they got stripes?

Quand partent-ils?
When are they leaving?

Comment vas-tu ?
How are you?

 

ATTENTION: in the inverted form, quoi becomes que or qu' :

Que veut-il ?
What does he want?

Qu'écoutes-tu à la radio ?
What do you listen to on the radio? 

 

These question words are always placed at the start with inverted forms.

See also Questions: Que ... = What ... ? and 

 

For more question types, see also:

Asking yes/no questions with intonation, est-ce que, n'est-ce pas

Forming inverted questions in Le Présent (except il, elle, on forms)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Tu vas comment ?
How are you?


est-ce que tu vas ?
Where are you going?


Qu'écoutes-tu à la radio ?
What do you listen to on the radio? 


Comment tu vas ?
How are you?



Qu'est-ce qu'elle veut faire?
What does she want to do?


Que veut-il ?
What does he want?


Comment vas-tu ?
How are you?


Combien est-ce que ça coûte?
How much does it cost?


Pourquoi ont-ils des rayures ?
Why have they got stripes?


Quand partent-ils?
When are they leaving?


Quand est-ce que vous quittez Chicago?
When do you leave Chicago?


forwards


Pourquoi tu rigoles? 
Why are you laughing?


Tu fais ça comment ?
How are you doing that?


C'est quand ?
When is it?


C'est quoi ?
What is it?


C'est qui ?
Who is it?


C'est combien ?
How much is that?


C'est où ?
Where is it?


inverted


Qui est-ce ?
Who is it?


Qu'est-ce?
What is it?


Q&A Forum 24 questions, 61 answers

BrianC1Kwiziq community member

"Où je mets mes chaussures d'habitude ?"

One of the questions lists "Où je mets mes chaussures d'habitude ?" as a correct answer. However, this does not appear to be one of the three ways of asking a question given in the lesson. According to the lesson, où must be followed by inversion (or est-ce que), so it would be "Où mets-je mes chaussures d'habitude ?" Why isn't inversion needed here?

Asked 2 months ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

In the lesson linked to your question I couldn't find where it says that must be followed by inversion.

The three ways to ask the question::

Où je mets mes chaussures? or Je mets mes chaussures où?
Où est-ce que je mets mes chaussures?
Où mets-je mes chaussures?

JohnA2Kwiziq community member
Related to this topic, the following response was shown to be acceptable "Où mets-je mes chaussures d'habitude ?" I didn't check this particular answer, seems wrong. I thought that inversion using 1st person singular is not done (except special cases, like puis-je, etc). Is this a special case?
CécileKwiziq team member

Just to add to the discussion, 

mets-je mes chaussures ...?

is possible but it does sound very posh just like 'puis-je' and you would avoid it in everyday speech.

"Où je mets mes chaussures d'habitude ?"

One of the questions lists "Où je mets mes chaussures d'habitude ?" as a correct answer. However, this does not appear to be one of the three ways of asking a question given in the lesson. According to the lesson, où must be followed by inversion (or est-ce que), so it would be "Où mets-je mes chaussures d'habitude ?" Why isn't inversion needed here?

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BrunoA0Kwiziq community member

Asking "Comment il s'appele" is correct????

Asked 6 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Bruno ,

It is correct but very informal ...Note the double -l :

Comment il s’appelle ?

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Yes, that's correct.

Asking "Comment il s'appele" is correct????

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PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Is it correct Comment est ce que le chat voit dans le noir?

Asked 7 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Patricia,

Yes this sentence is correct.

Bonne continuation !

Is it correct Comment est ce que le chat voit dans le noir?

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PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

If we have a substantive in the questions for example in the sentence how is Michael? Where do i put the name? Comment Michael va or Comment va Michel

Asked 7 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Patrizia,

Michel, comment va-t-il ?

Or 

Comment va Michael?

If we have a substantive in the questions for example in the sentence how is Michael? Where do i put the name? Comment Michael va or Comment va Michel

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PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks! Are they correct those? Elle est comment, la cantine? Elle arrive quand, la neige? Il serait oú, mon boureau? Oú elle est, la poulette?/El

Asked 8 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

answered...

PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Yeah i know. I didn't know how to cancel the question! Anyway thanks for answering me

Thanks! Are they correct those? Elle est comment, la cantine? Elle arrive quand, la neige? Il serait oú, mon boureau? Oú elle est, la poulette?/El

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PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

I have a question : if i say 1)Quand a ete fait construire l'eglise? 2) Quand est ce que a ete fait construire l'eglise? Are they correct?

Asked 8 months ago
PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributorCorrect answer

Thanks! Are they correct those?

Elle est comment, la cantine?

Elle arrive quand, la neige?

Il serait oú, mon boureau?

Oú elle est, la poulette?/Elle est oú, la poulette?

I have found these questions on internet, but i never saw this type of construction..Are they right?

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

If I wanted to know when the church was built, I would use one of those possibilities:

1) L'église a été construite quand?

2) Quand l'église a-t-elle été contruite?

3) Quand est-ce que l'église a été construite?

PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks? And are those correct? Cause i never saw this construction on internet?

Elle est comment, la cantine?

Elle arrive quand, la neige?

Il serait oú, mon boureau?

Oú elle est la poulette?

Elle est oú, la poulette?

I have a question : if i say 1)Quand a ete fait construire l'eglise? 2) Quand est ce que a ete fait construire l'eglise? Are they correct?

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Claudia A2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Salut a tous!

In the audio for "Quand partent-ils" I hear partetil, I thought it would sound more like par til

Merci

Asked 9 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Claudia,

You are hearing right and it should be "partent-ils"(3 syllables).

What you are suggesting would be the singular -

"part-il" ( 2 syllables)

CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Claudia,

The 'ent' is not pronounced but in 'partent-ils' you have to sound the last 't' of the 'ent'.

If you didn't you would hear the singular 'part-il'.

You might hear it pronounced in every day speak as two syllables but with an emphasis on the 't' to make it a double sound.

But very good query!

 

Claudia A2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Salut Cecile

I thought that in the 3rd person plural in the present tense, the "ent" was never pronounced.

Ils tombent  would sound tombe

Ils chantent  would sound chant

Ils regardent, etc.

Claudia A2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Forgot to tick to recieve your response.

Claudia A2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Merci beaucoup

Salut a tous!

In the audio for "Quand partent-ils" I hear partetil, I thought it would sound more like par til

Merci

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ShreyA1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Doubt in sentence structure

Bonjour Madame,

In the sentence 'Paul et Hélène sont mes amis.'

The question for this would be-

1.Qui est tes amis?

OR

2.Qui sont tes amis?

Pls guide which one of the following is correct and what is the rule behind it ?

Asked 10 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Varsha, 

The correct question would be :

Qui sont tes amis?

the verb 'être' (to be) having to agree with 'amis' (friends) which is plural ...

Hope this helps!

ShreyA1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Merci Madame

Doubt in sentence structure

Bonjour Madame,

In the sentence 'Paul et Hélène sont mes amis.'

The question for this would be-

1.Qui est tes amis?

OR

2.Qui sont tes amis?

Pls guide which one of the following is correct and what is the rule behind it ?

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JoanA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

To ask 'where is the chair?' using est-ce que and inversion form

est-ce que: should i say 'Où est-ce que la chaise?' or 'Où est-ce que la chaise est? or 'Où est-ce qu'est la chaise'?

inversion: 'Où la chaise est-elle?'

Thanks

Asked 11 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Joan,

Où est-ce qu'est la chaise? is correct.

Où la chaise est-elle? is correct too.

You would probably say:

La chaise est où? in every day French not as elegant but adequate...

Hope this helps!

CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Not all - the following ones are incorrect : 

Oú elle est  ----> Elle est oú?

Oú  elles se trouvent -------> Oú se trouvent-elles?

Oú ils sont  -----> Oú sont-ils?

 

 

PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Is it possible to say Oú est la chair?

CécileKwiziq team member

Hi Patrizia, 

Yes, in every day speech you could say -

Où est la chaise?

PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks and are they correct these sentences?

Oú est -elle?

Oú elle est?

Oú se trouvent les filles?

Oú elles se trouvent?

Oú sont- ils?

Oú sont les filles?

PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks and are those right?

Oú est-elle?

Oú elle est?

Oú se trouvent les filles?

Oú elles se trouvent?

Oú sont-ils?

Oú ils sont?

Oú sont les filles?

PatriziaA0Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Thanks! Are they correct those?

Elle est comment, la cantine?

Elle arrive quand, la neige?

Il serait oú, mon boureau?

Oú elle est, la poulette?/Elle est oú, la poulette?

CécileKwiziq team member

Yes, Patrizia but in an informal setting...

To ask 'where is the chair?' using est-ce que and inversion form

est-ce que: should i say 'Où est-ce que la chaise?' or 'Où est-ce que la chaise est? or 'Où est-ce qu'est la chaise'?

inversion: 'Où la chaise est-elle?'

Thanks

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LathaB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Could you ps explain what is wrong in'Ouvre-t-on les cadeaux quand ?'

Asked 11 months ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

The question words are always placed at the start in the inverted question form.

Quand ouvre-t-on les cadeaux?

LathaB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
D'accord , J'ai compris.Merci beaucoup.

Could you ps explain what is wrong in'Ouvre-t-on les cadeaux quand ?'

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DavidC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

The writing challenge asked "How much is it"

The translation "C'est combien" was not accepted. Isn't this just as acceptable as the 4 or 5 other translations that were offered? And it has the benefit of being less wordy.
Asked 1 year ago

The writing challenge asked "How much is it"

The translation "C'est combien" was not accepted. Isn't this just as acceptable as the 4 or 5 other translations that were offered? And it has the benefit of being less wordy.

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CrystalMaidenC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

va-t-il What does the -t-il mean?

I know now that it means " does he go, " but the average person reading this wouldn't know that. -T-il is perhaps the most confusing thing about French question-making. What does the -t- even mean? Can't mean tu or te judging by the context, so why's it there? Just for phonetic reasons, like the l' in si l'on? This should really be explained in the lesson, what -t-il means.
Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

The "t" is just interposed to prevent two vowels from clashing, is all. Nothing deep, no reference to anything grammatical. sometimes things really are simple ;))

-- Chris. 

CrystalMaidenC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Oh good, so like the l in si l'on, just like I suspected. Still, I wish that was included in the lesson, if only as a side-note considering it's something you need to know to be able to answer one of the micro-quizes.

va-t-il What does the -t-il mean?

I know now that it means " does he go, " but the average person reading this wouldn't know that. -T-il is perhaps the most confusing thing about French question-making. What does the -t- even mean? Can't mean tu or te judging by the context, so why's it there? Just for phonetic reasons, like the l' in si l'on? This should really be explained in the lesson, what -t-il means.

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SA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Questions with vous form?

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

"Comment allez-vous?" Should do the trick. The inverted form is the one I hear most often used. 

-- Chris. 

SA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Sorry, my question was incomplete: How are you? = Comment vas-tu ? or Comment tu vas ? So, is it Comment allez-vous? Commet vous allez? Where are you? = Où es-tu? So, is it Où êtes vous? Does it sound normal?
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Yes, it is "où êtes-vous?" (Note the hyphen in the inverted form). 

-- Chris (not a native speaker). 

SA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Thank you Chris, and "how are you? with vous?
SA1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Thank you Chris, it is strange that I have to try hard to find questions with "vous" form! Even google translate uses "tu" form! I know google is not the best way to learn, but whatever makes me understand this confusion.

Questions with vous form?

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StuartB1Kwiziq community member

I didn’t think the lesson prepared for me the present opening question ...

Where did all those ‘t’s come from? I didn’t understand the difference between the answers - well done to all thise below who did, but this was - and will probably remain - a mystery to me :(
Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Can you post a specific sentence you have problems with? -- Chris.
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Stuart! For issues on specific questions, it's easier to use the "report" button in your correction board, as it gives us access to the specific question you're referring to, and makes it easier for us to answer you :) Bonne journée !
StuartB1Kwiziq community member
Just to say that the majority of the examples used three or four words, and the question seemed almost treble that number with a good deal more complexity - for a novice like me. I didn't feel as though the examples prepared me for the question, that's all.

I didn’t think the lesson prepared for me the present opening question ...

Where did all those ‘t’s come from? I didn’t understand the difference between the answers - well done to all thise below who did, but this was - and will probably remain - a mystery to me :(

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ReneB2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Question word + est-ce-que :

Mes amis français m'ont dit que cette forme est incorrecte, que "est-ce-que tu vas à... " est juste, mais pas "où est-ce-que tu vas". Qu'en pensez-vous ?
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Rene,

You will hear the three following questions for 'Where are you going?' in French.

They are all correct but have grouped them from more formal to casual.

"Où vas-tu?"

"Où est-ce que tu vas? "

"Tu vas où?"

Hope this helps!

 

RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Bonsoir Rene, En parlant français formel, la forme correcte est : «Combien d'euros est-ce que ça coûte?» ou «Pourquoi est-ce que vous voudriez faire ça». Mais, d'habitude, au cours d’une discussion la forme changerait un peu parce que c'est plus informel. La forme la plus formelle est l'utilisation de l'inversion du sujet-verbe.
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
"Où est-ce que tu vas" sounds a bit stilted when used in a normal conversational context. That's because you'd much rather use "Tu vas où?" our even "Où vas-tu?". Shorter and more to the point. Although "où est-ce que tu vas" is grammatically perfectly alright. Sometimes the inverted form, although considered in general to be more formal, is the expected form. As in, "Comment vas-tu?" wich is used this way even on informal occasions. It is probably best to be well versed in all 3 forms of questions and then start reading and participating in spoken French. You'll get a feeling for when which form is more appropriate and "expected" by the native French speaker. -- Chris (not a native speaker).

Question word + est-ce-que :

Mes amis français m'ont dit que cette forme est incorrecte, que "est-ce-que tu vas à... " est juste, mais pas "où est-ce-que tu vas". Qu'en pensez-vous ?

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HarrisC1Kwiziq community member

Combien

If i wanted to say: "how many of them do you want me to buy?" Can I say it like this: - <> Or would this be better: - <>
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Harris,

Sorry about the delay in answering you question...

I would say the three possibilities are:

Tu veux que j'en achète combien?

Combien veux-tu que j'en achète?

Combien est-ce que tu veux que j'en achète?

The last one is a bit clumsier than the other two.

Hope this helps!

HarrisC1Kwiziq community member
Let me try that again. Can I say it like this: "combien en veux-tu que j'achète?" Or would this be better: "Tu veux que j'en achète combien?"
RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Bonjour Harris, «Combien est-ce que tu voudrais que j'en achète?» would be my first inclination. However, keep in mind that just like your examples, there are probably many more ways to phrase the question in French. J'espère que ma réponse vous aiderait. Bonne chance et bonne continuation dans vos études en français, la langue de Molière et qui a été utilisé par le monde français depuis l’époque d’Hugues Capet Ron (un locuteur non natif )

Combien

If i wanted to say: "how many of them do you want me to buy?" Can I say it like this: - <> Or would this be better: - <>

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ManalA0Kwiziq community member

How do i reconstruct the question "où a-t-elle appris le francais" to include est-ce que?

If i follow the rule, then it should be "où est-ce que a-t-elle appris le francais" but is that correct?
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Manal ! The lesson states that with "est-ce que", the order of the sentence remains normal - no inversion - so in this case it would be: "Où est-ce qu'elle a appris le français ?" Bonne journée !

How do i reconstruct the question "où a-t-elle appris le francais" to include est-ce que?

If i follow the rule, then it should be "où est-ce que a-t-elle appris le francais" but is that correct?

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KariB2Kwiziq community member

Why is this correct and the other not?

Why is je mets mes chaussures où d'habitude? correct but when you invert the verb and keep the rest the same it is incorrect? Per the quiz "mets-je mes chaussures où d'habitude? is incorrect. I didn't choose either of them as it seemed strange to have the où in the middle like that but was surprised to see one of them was in fact correct. Please explain. Thanks.
Asked 2 years ago
NicholasC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
You can only invert certain verbs. dis-je, suis-je, ai-je for example but it iform and custom not something you can do with all verbs, that would be far too simple!
RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
https://www.thoughtco.com/uses-of-french-inversion-4086442 https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/inversion/ Bonjour Kari, These two links are lessons written by Laura that explains the inversion a little more. Perhaps this will aid you somewhat. Ron
RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
Bonsoir Kari, Actually any verb can be used in inversion to form a question. If you read French literature, this is very common. In fact, inversion is considered by some to be a more formal structure. From the lesson: Simple Yes/No Questions The forms je peux, je vais, je suis, j'ai can be inverted but these forms are rarely used nowadays, as they're considered very formal and old-fashioned: Puis-je avoir le pain, s'il-vous-plaît? May I have the bread, please? Suis-je à la bonne adresse? Am I at the right address? Ai-je assez d'argent? Do I have enough money? Vais-je dans la bonne direction? Am I going the right way? Notice that je peux becomes irregular in the inverted form puis-je, probably to ease pronunciation. This structure is very formal as we stated before, so would only be used in polite contexts: the nearest English equivalent would be May I? Note also that although it's rare to invert Je + verb to make a question, it does happen with some verbs. I believe what Nicholas is referencing, if I may, is the inversion of first person, singular verbs using «Je», please see above. For the most part, most of the inversion verbs in literature that I run across do not use the first person, singular inversion. J'espère que cela vous aidera. Bonne chance, Ron
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
"Mets-je mes chaussures où d'habitude?" is incorrect because the "où" is in the wrong spot. You could say, "Où mets-je mes chaussures d'habitude?" and that would be just fine. When forming a question by inversion you put the interrogative pronoun in front of the sentence. Here are the three ways to ask this question for comparison: "Je mets mes chaussures où d'habitude?" "Où est-ce que je mets mes chaussures d'habitude?" "Où mets-je mes chaussures d'habitude?" Felitations amicales, -- Chris.

Why is this correct and the other not?

Why is je mets mes chaussures où d'habitude? correct but when you invert the verb and keep the rest the same it is incorrect? Per the quiz "mets-je mes chaussures où d'habitude? is incorrect. I didn't choose either of them as it seemed strange to have the où in the middle like that but was surprised to see one of them was in fact correct. Please explain. Thanks.

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SueC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Why is quand on ouvre les cadeaux ? marked correct?

if I were to read Quand on ouvre les cadeaux I would not expect to have a question mark at the end but a following clause. when I open the presents..... I understand that this perhaps is a very informal spoken form for a question where the question is shown by intonation. BUT in this kwiz it was a written question and not a spoke question. For this reason I feel it not right that not marking this phrase as right gives a nearly correct reponse. Ok it is good to realise that there are different levels of french usage , but where is the indictaion in the written form that it was a question, other that the question mark.
Asked 2 years ago
RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
In French, when either inversion, est-ce que, qui est-ce qui, or qu'est-ce que are omitted, then it becomes a matter of a normal statement with intonation of a question. In the case cited, it is a written, simple question, hence the question mark is the only clue that it was a question. J'espère que ma réponse vous aide.
RonC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
In French, when either inversion, est-ce que, qui est-ce qui, or qu'est-ce que are omitted, then it becomes a matter of a normal statement with intonation of a question. In the case cited, it is a written, simple question, hence the question mark is the only clue that it was a question. J'espère que ma réponse vous aide.

Why is quand on ouvre les cadeaux ? marked correct?

if I were to read Quand on ouvre les cadeaux I would not expect to have a question mark at the end but a following clause. when I open the presents..... I understand that this perhaps is a very informal spoken form for a question where the question is shown by intonation. BUT in this kwiz it was a written question and not a spoke question. For this reason I feel it not right that not marking this phrase as right gives a nearly correct reponse. Ok it is good to realise that there are different levels of french usage , but where is the indictaion in the written form that it was a question, other that the question mark.

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TomC1Kwiziq community member

Please review the logic behind "Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?" being incorrect

Please go back to the logic behind why "Comment tu vas" (question - subject - verb) is correct, but "Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?" is an incorrect question form. They both have the same structure of Question - subject - verb. Thanks you so much for your help. Tom
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Tom ! This question has now been updated to accept this option as Correct. The fact is that "Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?" would be the least colloquial way to order that specific question, hence the issue with our question. However, though sounding a bit off to my native ears due to its lack of use, this is not incorrect, and the question has now been updated accordingly. À bientôt !

Please review the logic behind "Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?" being incorrect

Please go back to the logic behind why "Comment tu vas" (question - subject - verb) is correct, but "Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?" is an incorrect question form. They both have the same structure of Question - subject - verb. Thanks you so much for your help. Tom

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MeghnaC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Ça coûte combien?

Have often heard that phrase. Is it wrong considering that question word is at the end? Colloquial perhaps?
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Meghna, This is the same case as in your previous question. This form is not the inverted form, which here would be: "Combien cela coûte-t-il ?" Note that "ça" turns back to its more elegant form "cela" as this question form is itself more sophisticated. See also: Forming inverted questions in Le Présent with il, elle, on Bonnes fêtes !
MeghnaC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Thank you. I think I get this now, the clarification on the part of inversion really helped. More tests on the subject and my scores will confirm. Bonnes fêtes !

Ça coûte combien?

Have often heard that phrase. Is it wrong considering that question word is at the end? Colloquial perhaps?

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MeghnaC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Quand at beginning or end?

Why is ´Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?´ an incorrect response in the testant ´On ouvre les cadeaux quand ?´ is correct? As per this lesson, when we use the inverted form, the question word is at the beginning of the sentence.
Asked 2 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Meghna, the term "inverted form" refers to the inversion of the verb and its subject, not the interrogative word. When you keep the normal order "subject + verb", the interrogative word needs to be at the end. Here is the inverted form of this question: "Quand ouvre-t-on les cadeaux ?" See also : Forming inverted questions in Le Présent with il, elle, on I hope that's helpful! Bonnes Fêtes et à bientôt !
SherryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Hello, Aurélie. I have a follow-up question about this. The first example in the lesson is "Comment tu vas?" What is different about that question that "comment" can precede "tu vas" but "quand" can't precede "on ouvre les cadeaux" (a quiz question I also got wrong)? Is one of them an an exception to the rule?
SherryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Here's another example. This should have been selected on a check-all-that-apply question: "Où je mets mes chaussures d'habitude ?" I didn't check it because I had gotten the "quand on ouvre..." question wrong. I'm confused!
SherryC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Never mind! I had misread "note also that these words are always placed at the start with inverted forms" as meaning the words must be placed at the start *whenever* inverted forms were used and not that inverted forms are *always* used with these words, which themselves must always be at the start. It's clear now.

Quand at beginning or end?

Why is ´Quand on ouvre les cadeaux ?´ an incorrect response in the testant ´On ouvre les cadeaux quand ?´ is correct? As per this lesson, when we use the inverted form, the question word is at the beginning of the sentence.

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JohnnyC1Kwiziq community member

Missing example for que

You mentioned in the inverted question form that "Note that in this case, quoi becomes que or qu" but you forgot to include an example.
Asked 3 years ago
JohnnyC1Kwiziq community member
Thanks. It's amazing that you responded so quickly. Other websites take months to make changes. I apologize for pointing this out, but quoi also becomes qu' in the "est-ce que" form, not just in the invert form. I would just move the note to number 2. Thanks.

Missing example for que

You mentioned in the inverted question form that "Note that in this case, quoi becomes que or qu" but you forgot to include an example.

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JoakimC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Que/quoi

This lesson tells us to use Que at the beginning, or Quoi at the end of a question. So what about the phrase "Quoi de neuf ?"
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member
Bonjour Joakim! That's a great question, but I think I've got an explanation :) When asking simply "What?" with no verb or clause afterwards, you will use the word "Quoi ?" rather than "Que ?" (or "Comment ?" which is considered a more elegant term). Anyway, so when you ask "Quoi de neuf ?", there is no clause, as you're literally asking "What new?", hence the use of "quoi" and not "que". [You could use "que" if the question was "What is new?" = "Qu'est-ce qui est nouveau ?" or the rule would apply with "what [is there] new?" = "Qu'y a-t-il de nouveau ?" vs "Il y a quoi de nouveau ?". I hope that's helpful!

Que/quoi

This lesson tells us to use Que at the beginning, or Quoi at the end of a question. So what about the phrase "Quoi de neuf ?"

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