On its own?

MelisaA2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

On its own?

"You can also use pas du tout on its own, in non-verbal sentences:"
Does this mean it isn't acceptable to use it on its own when speaking?
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Melisa,

As in: 

Q : Vous êtes faché avec Sandrine ? = Have you fallen out with Sandrine?

A : Pas du tout! Not at all!

 

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
I don't understand your question. By "on its own" you mean use it as a sentence by itself? If so, the answer is yes. There is an example of this in the lesson. 
AlanC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor
I think the confusion comes from the word "verbal". In this case "non-verbal" means "without a verb", rather than "not oral".
MelisaA2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor
Alan, yes, that is what was confusing me. I've never seen the word non-verbal used to mean without a verb so that didn't even occur to me. I thought they must mean to only use it in writing! Thanks for the clarification.
Melisa asked:View original

On its own?

"You can also use pas du tout on its own, in non-verbal sentences:"
Does this mean it isn't acceptable to use it on its own when speaking?

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