The use of present doesn't already express the action is happening in the action?

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Paola

Kwiziq community member

20 January 2019

1 reply

The use of present doesn't already express the action is happening in the action?

For example, if I say "Elle faire ses devoirs" instead of "Elle est en train de faire ses devoirs", what is the difference? Thank you

This question relates to:
French lesson "Être en train de : expressing ongoing actions in the present"

Chris

Kwiziq community member

21 January 2019

21/01/19

Elle fait ses devoirs. -- She does her homework. This is a general statement in the present tense. Even though it is in present tense, it has a bit of a "timeless" quality. If you want to express that she is right at it, that very moment, in her room, doing her homework, in English you would use the continuous form: "She is doing her homework." In French there is no continuous form. So if you want to stress that something is happening as you speak, you can use "être en train".

Elle est en train de faire ses devoirs. -- She is doing her homework (right now, as we speak). She is in the process of doing her homework.

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