The French Way?

DanielleC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

The French Way?

Are these sentences structured in a way that is considered more "French"? Because if I were saying them in English I wouldn't often start the example sentences with "By the time...", I would flip the clauses. Is that it "the French way" to start sentences with "le temps que"?

Ex.  Il avait déjà bu une bouteille entière le temps que je finisse de manger.

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

The order of adverbial clauses is different in French. Long clauses (like the one you're asking about) are best placed at the end.

AlanC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

But the first two examples in the lesson (including the one that Danielle asked about) have "Le temps que ..." at the beginning.

The lesson gives the impression that it means "by the time that" when it's at the beginning, and "in the time that" when it's at the end. But it doesn't say that explicitly, so I'm also a bit unsure about the correct usage.

The French Way?

Are these sentences structured in a way that is considered more "French"? Because if I were saying them in English I wouldn't often start the example sentences with "By the time...", I would flip the clauses. Is that it "the French way" to start sentences with "le temps que"?

Ex.  Il avait déjà bu une bouteille entière le temps que je finisse de manger.

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