Passer par vs. passer devant

CarolC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Passer par vs. passer devant

I understood that the par or devant were essentially the same - both mean to pass by something.  I answered passer devant in this questions just to use a different way of expressing the same meaning.  It was, however, said to be an error and passer par was the correct answer.  Please explain.  Thanks.

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Yes, in a sepecific instance they can come close in meaning.

Je passe par chez toi. -- I'm dropping by your place.
Je passe par devant chez toi. -- I'm passing by your place. (No stopping.)
Je passe devant chez toi. -- I'm passing by your place. (No stopping.)

CarolC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

The examples given in the explanation seem to indicate that Passer par can also mean to pass by  (without stopping by) as in passe par la boulangerie.  Thanks for your help.

Passer par vs. passer devant

I understood that the par or devant were essentially the same - both mean to pass by something.  I answered passer devant in this questions just to use a different way of expressing the same meaning.  It was, however, said to be an error and passer par was the correct answer.  Please explain.  Thanks.

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