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Me and myself?

Shounak P.A2Kwiziq community member

Me and myself?

I was wondering what Me, myself and Irene would translate to in French. Would it be Je, moi et Irene? Or Moi, moi et Irene? 

Asked 3 years ago
Alan G.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

It's not a normal expression in English, either. It's a film title about a man with a split personality. In France it's translated as "Fous d'Irène", but in Québec it's indeed "Moi, moi-même et Irène".

I suppose it does lose the pun of "Me, Myself and I[rene]", though.

Chris W.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

"Me, myself and Irene" is a stylistic idiosyncrasy of English. It wouldn't translate well and I've never heard it used in French. You'd simply say moi et Irene.

Jim J.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Me, myself and Irene        --  Moi, moi-même et Irene.

Chris W.C1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

@Jim: are you sure that would isn't a literal translation which doesn't work in French? Similar to "everyone and their uncle" in English means "a lot of people" but chaqu'un et son oncle wouldn't work in French.

Me and myself?

I was wondering what Me, myself and Irene would translate to in French. Would it be Je, moi et Irene? Or Moi, moi et Irene? 

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