l'appréhension qui lui avait serré le ventre avant de partir

JamesC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

l'appréhension qui lui avait serré le ventre avant de partir

Why in this sentence is both 'lui' and 'le' needed? As isn't "le" meaning "her" here because "ventre" is a body part? 


The same thing with the sentence "Le vent vivifiant lui fouettait le visage"

Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi James,

Just to add to Chris' answer in both expressions 'lui' is an indirect object pronoun and it stands for him or her. Her in this case as it is a woman we are talking about.

Lit- 

Le vent fouettait à elle le visage

L'appréhension avait serré (à elle) le ventre...

If you don't use lui you don't know who the action is happening to, but you could say something like :

le vent vivifiant fouettait le visage aux enfants 

l'appréhension avait serré le ventre à Marie avant de partir

 

 

Hope this helps!

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

L'appéhension, qui lui avait serré le ventre. -- The apprehension, which had gripped his stomach.

Le ventre -- the stomach, is a masculine noun and hence the le.

The function and meaning of lui in this sentence becomes more apparent in a literal translation: the apprehension which gripped him the stomach. This kind of construction is quite common in French and is often translated to English by transforming the indirect object pronoun (lui) into a posessive pronoun (his) in English.

l'appréhension qui lui avait serré le ventre avant de partir

Why in this sentence is both 'lui' and 'le' needed? As isn't "le" meaning "her" here because "ventre" is a body part? 


The same thing with the sentence "Le vent vivifiant lui fouettait le visage"

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level
Clever stuff happening!