Anthony brings his sunglasses (in case it's sunny.) (on a C1 test)

BarbaraC1Kwiziq community member

Anthony brings his sunglasses (in case it's sunny.) (on a C1 test)

My answer - Anthony apporte des lunettes de soleil au cas où il ferait du soleil. Marked nearly correct. Your correct answer - .......... au cas où il ferait BEAU. Doesn't that mean - in case the weather is nice, beautiful? Can you also say -- au cas où il y aurait du soleil. Please explain.
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Barbara,

I think 'Il ferait soleil ' would have been accepted but not with the 'du'.

You might say,

"il y a du soleil aujourd'hui, on a de la chance pour notre sortie." (The sun is shining today, we are in luck for our outing.)

Faire beau in French is always associated with the sun shining....

Hope this helps!

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi Barbara,

"Il faut beau" is apparently the phrase most commonly used to refer to nice weather. Specifically, if you want to say that the sun is shining, you can say "Il fait soleil", "Il y a du soleil" or "Il es ensoleillé". Whether or not "Il fait du soleil" may also be correct I don't really know, at least I haven't heard it said.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

LucindaA2Kwiziq community member

Here's a link you might find helpful. Some people apparently don't consider "Il fait soleil" proper French. Talking about the weather with il fait + [adjective]

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Hi L, thanks for bringing this to my attention. I talked to a French native speaker and she said that "Il fait soleil" sounded OK. Searching the net it seems that French Canadians tend to use it more liberally than speakers from France.

To be perfectly honest: to my ears "Il fait soleil" sounds strange, too, but it is apparently in use.

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Just to correct a typo in my initial post: it should be "Il fait beau" and not "il faut beau".

-- Chris.

BarbaraC1Kwiziq community member

Hi Chris,

Il fait beau = It's nice out, The weather is beautiful.  Il fait du soleil et il y a du soleil both mean it's sunny.  My question was why would the test correct answer say "Anthony apporte ses lunettes de soleil au cas où il ferait BEAU.  when the English translation was "Anthony brings his sunglasses in case it's SUNNY? Why beau instead of du soleil? Minor point but interested to know. I'm positive that Il fait DU soleil is correct although maybe not the first choice for it's sunny.

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Yes, Barbara, I agree with you. The problem seems to be that there is no 1:1 translation which leaves no room for interpretation as to how to translate it. The most natural way to say "Il fait beau" in English would, for me, be "It's nice out" But that doesn't correspond to the way most frequently used in French (i.e., il fait beau). Neither do any of the other ways to paraphrase it in English.

I understand your frustration that you get penalized for something which isn't even a mistake but I don't know of a good solution either. Do you have a suggestion?

-- Chris (not a native speaker).

LucindaA2Kwiziq community member
I wish we had a way to learn Québécois French. That's the one I'd use the most!
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

:))) In speaking to some native French people they seem to have a low opinion of Canadian French. But that's typical, I'd say. It is similar between Austria and Germany with respect to the German language.

-- Chris.

Anthony brings his sunglasses (in case it's sunny.) (on a C1 test)

My answer - Anthony apporte des lunettes de soleil au cas où il ferait du soleil. Marked nearly correct. Your correct answer - .......... au cas où il ferait BEAU. Doesn't that mean - in case the weather is nice, beautiful? Can you also say -- au cas où il y aurait du soleil. Please explain.

Sign in to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Ask a question

Find your French level for FREE

Test your French to the CEFR standard

Find your French level >>
How has your day been?