Forming the feminine of adjectives ending in -el, -eil, -il, -ul, -et, -s

Look at these feminine adjectives:

Georges est cruel mais Flora n'est pas cruelle.
George is cruel but Flora is not cruel.

Mon manteau est pareil, et ma cravate est pareille.
My coat is the same, and my tie is the same.

Le jardin est net et la maison est nette aussi.
The garden is neat and the house is neat too.

Le journal télévisé n'est pas nul mais la télé-réalité est nulle.
The news is not lame but reality TV is lame.

François n'est pas professionnel mais Diane est professionnelle.
François is not professional but Diane is professional.

Il est gentil et elle est gentille.
He is kind and she is kind.

Voilà un bon gâteau et une bonne boisson.
Here is a good cake and a good drink.

Gary est gros mais Suzanne est très grosse.
Gary is fat but Suzanne is very fat.

Il y a un château ancien et une église ancienne.
There is an ancient castle and an ancient church.

Le bacon est gras mais la salade n'est pas grasse.
Bacon is fatty but salad is not fatty.

Note that adjectives ending in -el, -eil, -il, -ul, -en, -on, -et and -s double the final consonant in the feminine form and then add -e.

In many but not all cases, the change can be heard in speech.

 

See also Forming the feminine of nouns and adjectives ending in -ien, -ion, -on

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources


sound different in the feminine form


Il est gentil et elle est gentille.
He is kind and she is kind.


Le bacon est gras mais la salade n'est pas grasse.
Bacon is fatty but salad is not fatty.


Gary est gros mais Suzanne est très grosse.
Gary is fat but Suzanne is very fat.


sound the same in both forms


François n'est pas professionnel mais Diane est professionnelle.
François is not professional but Diane is professional.


Mon manteau est pareil, et ma cravate est pareille.
My coat is the same, and my tie is the same.


Le jardin est net et la maison est nette aussi.
The garden is neat and the house is neat too.


Le journal télévisé n'est pas nul mais la télé-réalité est nulle.
The news is not lame but reality TV is lame.


Georges est cruel mais Flora n'est pas cruelle.
George is cruel but Flora is not cruel.


Q&A Forum 5 questions, 6 answers

BrianA2Kwiziq community member

Sounding the same

Il est gentil et elle est gentille.


This is under the ‘sound different’ section, but (to me) they sound the same. 

Asked 3 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Brian,

Gentil is pronounced - genti  with a short ‘i’ sound 

Gentille is pronounced - genti—ye with a ‘ye’ sound

Hope this helps!

 

Sounding the same

Il est gentil et elle est gentille.


This is under the ‘sound different’ section, but (to me) they sound the same. 

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RachelB2Kwiziq community member

Using le, la, les with body parts and clothing (definite articles)

In another lesson, it talks about not using mon, ton etc but using le, la etc. with clothing and parts of the body. Therefore, would it be better to say

"Le manteau est pareil, et la cravate est pareille " rather than "Mon manteau est pareil, et ma cravate est pareille" 

or can you say both or does it depend upon context?

Thanks

Rachel

Asked 10 months ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Rachel,

I am not quite sure which other lesson you are referring to but in this example it just depends whether you are talking about ‘the coat ‘ and ‘the tie’ over there or ‘my coat/tie’ (the ones that belong to me).

So, yes you could say both depending on the context. The point of the lesson was how the adjective agrees with the noun...

Hope this helps!

Using le, la, les with body parts and clothing (definite articles)

In another lesson, it talks about not using mon, ton etc but using le, la etc. with clothing and parts of the body. Therefore, would it be better to say

"Le manteau est pareil, et la cravate est pareille " rather than "Mon manteau est pareil, et ma cravate est pareille" 

or can you say both or does it depend upon context?

Thanks

Rachel

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BunA2Kwiziq community member

The range of the adjectives ending in -s

From the youtube video, it points that excepting 'bas, gras, gros, épais, exprès, las, métis, where the final -s is doubled in the feminine form.' The rest of -s adjctives should change with general feminine rule. 
Asked 1 year ago
CécileKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Hi Bun,

I am not sure I understand your question, would you explain what the problem is please?

The range of the adjectives ending in -s

From the youtube video, it points that excepting 'bas, gras, gros, épais, exprès, las, métis, where the final -s is doubled in the feminine form.' The rest of -s adjctives should change with general feminine rule. 

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IanC1Kwiziq community member

Pronunciation of final 'e' in feminine

In the recording examples of feminine endings which are said not to sound different almost all the feminine words are given a distinct (if very short) '-yuh' sound at the end. Is this purely to add emphasis or because they are ending a sentence, or is it actually a different sound?
Asked 2 years ago
AshleyA2Kwiziq community memberCorrect answer
I can't say for certain since I haven't been learning French for very long, but I've been told by someone who speaks French from Quebec that the 'yuh' at the end of the word that you're hearing is actually from the two 'l's placed together, so the 'yuh' is produced from 'll' in both 'pareille' and 'gentille' not the 'e' at the end.
IanC1Kwiziq community member
I was thinking particularly of 'pareille' (and 'gentille'), both of which have the '-yuh', but 'cruelle', 'nulle' and 'professionelle' all have a distinct (short) '-luh' as well. Thanks for any help you can give, as it seems to crop up quite a lot in French that I hear!

Pronunciation of final 'e' in feminine

In the recording examples of feminine endings which are said not to sound different almost all the feminine words are given a distinct (if very short) '-yuh' sound at the end. Is this purely to add emphasis or because they are ending a sentence, or is it actually a different sound?

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DianeA1Kwiziq community member

My question is about the English translation of 'gras' and 'grass.'

In the question above, "Le bacon est gras mais la salade n'est pas grasse." is translated to: "Bacon is fat but salad is not fat." Wouldn't: "Bacon is fatty but salad is not fatty." be a more accurate translation? "Fat" is a noun or adjective describing size, whereas "fatty" describes something that is more caloric. Thanks in advance for your feedback.
Asked 3 years ago
AurélieKwiziq team member

Bonjour Diane ! Thanks so much for this precision, and the example has now been updated! Merci et à bientôt !

My question is about the English translation of 'gras' and 'grass.'

In the question above, "Le bacon est gras mais la salade n'est pas grasse." is translated to: "Bacon is fat but salad is not fat." Wouldn't: "Bacon is fatty but salad is not fatty." be a more accurate translation? "Fat" is a noun or adjective describing size, whereas "fatty" describes something that is more caloric. Thanks in advance for your feedback.

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