Ne ... nulle part = Nowhere (negation)

Look at these examples:

J'ai cherché partout, mais je ne l'ai trouvé nulle part.
I looked everywhere, but I didn't find it anywhere.

Il n'y a nulle part où je préférerais être.
There is nowhere where I would rather be.

Comme il pleuvait, Lise n'est allée nulle part.
As it was raining, Lise didn't go anywhere

Je n'ai vu Mathieu nulle part.
I didn't see Mathieu anywhere.

Il n'est jamais allé nulle part.
He never went anywhere.

 

Ne/n' ... nulle part means nowhere/ not anywhere.

While the negation ne/n' is placed before the conjugated verb as with other negations, it is worth noticing that nulle part is placed at the end of the clause, after the object of the verb (when there is one), and NOT right after the conjugated verb like other negations:

ne/n' + conjugated verb + [object] + [adverb] + nulle part

 

Note that when used on its own, you don't put ne/n'.

Où vas-tu? - Nulle part, pourquoi?
Where are you going? - Nowhere, why?

 

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Je n'ai vu Mathieu nulle part.
I didn't see Mathieu anywhere.


J'ai cherché partout, mais je ne l'ai trouvé nulle part.
I looked everywhere, but I didn't find it anywhere.


Il n'est jamais allé nulle part.
He never went anywhere.



Où vas-tu? - Nulle part, pourquoi?
Where are you going? - Nowhere, why?


Il n'y a nulle part où je préférerais être.
There is nowhere where I would rather be.


Comme il pleuvait, Lise n'est allée nulle part.
As it was raining, Lise didn't go anywhere


Q&A

Sundeepmunro

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

0 replies

désolé de taper plusieurs fois. Il y avait un problème

Sundeepmunro

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

2 replies

Quelqu'un peut-on changer cette phrase en négatif, s'il vous plaît: Mon ami a cherché partout.

Chris

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

6/02/19

Mon ami n'a cherché nulle part. -- My friend did not search anywhere.

Sundeepmunro

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

6/02/19

remerciement

Sundeepmunro

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

2 replies

Quelqu'un peut-on changer cette phrase en négatif, s'il vous plaît: <>.

Sundeepmunro

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

6/02/19

Quelqu'un peut-on changer cette phrase en négatif, s'il vous plaît: <>

Chris

Kwiziq community member

6 February 2019

6/02/19

answered already.

Buuuuulaa

Kwiziq community member

26 January 2019

4 replies

How will this sentence be changed to negation: Il y a la pollution partout. Thanks in advance

Chris

Kwiziq community member

27 January 2019

27/01/19

Il n'y a pas de pollution nulle part. 

Buuuuulaa

Kwiziq community member

27 January 2019

27/01/19

Merci beaucoup Monsieur Chris. But I still can't understand how 'la' changes to 'de' and why is there Pas ?Also will pollution come before 'nulle part' ? 

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

28 January 2019

28/01/19

Hi Buuuuuula,

The affirmative statement would be -

Il y a de la pollution partout.

The negative would then become-

Il n'y a pas de pollution nulle part.

Take a look at the following lesson which explains how 'de la' becomes 'de' after pas:

https://kwiziq.learnfrenchwithalexa.com/revision/grammar/the-partitive-article-in-negative-sentences

Hope this helps!

 

Buuuuulaa

Kwiziq community member

28 January 2019

28/01/19

Thank you Cécile

Dragana

Kwiziq community member

18 January 2019

1 reply

Pronunciation of - Il n'y a nulle part où je préférerais être

I don't hear this being pronounces as  préférerais  BUT as préférais.

I have played it several times.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

18 January 2019

18/01/19

Bonjour Dragana !

Indeed, the distinction here is very tenuous, even to Native ears :)Note however that although you can perfectly pronounce the "e" as in [préférerais] (which the updated audio file now does), many French people would pronounce this word as [préférrais], stressing the R and kind of skipping the [e] sound altogether, which makes the nuance very tricky to catch for non-Native ears!

I hope that's helpful!Merci et bonne journée !

nola

Kwiziq community member

7 February 2018

2 replies

When can one use n'importe où instead of nulle part for anywhere

Chris

Kwiziq community member

7 February 2018

7/02/18

Hi Nola,

"nulle part" -- nowhere
"n'importe où" -- anywhere, as in any ol' place.

Ça m'est égal, allons n'importe où. -- I don't care, let's go anywhere.
Il doit rester à la maison, il ne va nulle part. -- He must stay at home, he is not going anywhere.

Hope that helps, -- Chris (not a native speaker).

 

Latha

Kwiziq community member

26 December 2018

26/12/18

Then if I say 'Hier, Je ne suis allée nulle part' for Yesterday i did not go anywhere ..is right or wrong ps clarify.Still I am not very sure when to use n'apporte où/ nulle part.ps help

Melody

Kwiziq community member

4 January 2017

2 replies

Il n'est jamais allé nulle part.

In the sound recording of this it sounds like there is "v" or "va" sound between jamais and alle. Not what I would expect. Help, please.

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

4 January 2017

4/01/17

Bonjour Melody ! It was actually a "z" sound resulting from the liaison between "jamaiS" and "allé", but I agree that the quality wasn't great. I've now regenerated this sound file. I hope that's helpful! Bonne Année !

Melody

Kwiziq community member

4 January 2017

4/01/17

Thanks so much!

Melody

Kwiziq community member

3 January 2017

2 replies

Il n'y a nulle part où je préférerais être.

There is nowhere where I would rather be. This English translation is confusing and not something that would be normally said in English Rather: There is nowhere (else) I would rather be. The way it's stated, in English it would mean "I don't have a preference for where I am" . Maybe this IS the intent of the sentence. ?

Melody

Kwiziq community member

3 January 2017

3/01/17

Better English: "I don't have a preference AS TO where I am" .

Carolyn

Kwiziq community member

27 July 2018

27/07/18

I would have translated it as ‘There is nowhere I would rather be’. You don’t need the word where. 

Jeffrey

Kwiziq community member

18 January 2016

1 reply

Noun inside the negation?

In one of the questions on an exam, the correct answer was "Il ne voit Julie nulle part". Why is Julie included in between "ne" and "nulle part" while a sentence like "Il ne voit pas Julie" has Julie outside of the negation?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

19 January 2016

19/01/16

Bonjour Jeffrey, Thank you for your question. "Ne ... nulle part" is indeed a bit different from other negations, and our lesson has now been updated to fully reflect this. Please have a look: https://www.french-test.com/revision/grammar/how-to-say-nowhere-ne-nulle-part-negative-expressions I hope this is helpful! Merci!
Let me take a look at that...