Frais, long, favori, rigolo have irregular feminine forms (adjectives)

Look at these sentences:

L'eau est assez fraîche.
The water is quite cold.

Ma jupe est longue.
My skirt is long.

C'est ma chanson favorite.
It's my favourite song.

Ma petite sœur est rigolote !
My little sister is funny!

These adjectives are completely irregular in the feminine form:

frais -> fraîche (fresh)

Note that fraiche is also acceptable following the 1990 Spelling Reform.

long ->longue (long)

favori -> favorite (favourite)

rigolo ->rigolote (funny)

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Ma petite sœur est rigolote !
My little sister is funny!


C'est ma chanson favorite.
It's my favourite song.


Ma jupe est longue.
My skirt is long.


L'eau est assez fraîche.
The water is quite cold.


Q&A Forum 2 questions, 3 answers

How do you know when to use favori as opposed to préféré?

As I'm pretty sure they both mean favourite - does it matter on the context?

Asked 1 week ago
CécileKwiziq language super starCorrect answer

Hi Vanessa,

This is an interesting question as I would have argued that 'préféré' would always win hands down over 'favori' in everyday French conversation for the English 'favourite'.

As Chris points out the meaning is similar to English but of course, when 'favourite' is used to mean most likely to win ( as in a horse race or an award ceremony) you would only use 'favori/te' and never 'preféré/e' in French.

Strictly speaking , according to my Petit Robert -

favouri/te qui plaît particulièrement ( best loved/favoured/dearest)

préféré/ejugé meilleur (judged superior or better)

Personally, I would always say :

Zola est mon auteur préféré 

Symphony est ma chanson préférée 

etc...

It's like "favorite" and "preferred" in English: very similar usage.

How do you know when to use favori as opposed to préféré?

As I'm pretty sure they both mean favourite - does it matter on the context?

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TamaniA2

Incorrect example?

Does "L'eau est assez fraîche" translate to "The water is quite fresh?" Rather than quite cold?
Asked 2 years ago
GruffKwiziq language super star
Hi Tamani - "frais" can mean various things depending on the context. It was food then "fresh" might be the right translation but in the context of water it's more likely to mean chilled/cool (but not necessarily) . It could also mean fresh in the sense of "new" ("des nouvelles fraîches" = fresh news).
Tamani asked:View original

Incorrect example?

Does "L'eau est assez fraîche" translate to "The water is quite fresh?" Rather than quite cold?

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