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Conjugate regular -ir verbs in Le Présent (present tense)

Most verbs ending -ir in Le Présent (Present Tense) conjugate like this:

  new ending finir (to finish) choisir (to choose)
Je  -is finis choisis
Tu  -is finis choisis
Il/elle/on  -it finit choisit
Nous  -issons finissons choisissons
Vous  -issez finissez choisissez
Ils/elles  -issent finissent choisissent

Listen to these examples with finir:

Je finis mes devoirs.
I finish my homework.

Tu finis ton assiette ou pas de dessert.
You finish your plate or no dessert.

Miranda finit de faire sa valise.
Miranda is finishing packing her suitcase.

Nous finissons de décorer la pièce.
We finish decorating the room.

Vous finissez quand ?
When do you finish?

Les enfants finissent l'école dans une heure.
The children finish school in an hour.

Nous répartissons les bonbons entre nous quatre.
We're dividing the sweets between the four of us.

Note that the verb répartir is NOT a derivative of partir, but shares its root with the word repartition, and does follow the regular -IR conjugation. 

Pronunciation guide

In the singular forms, the -s and -t of finis and finit are silent.
All three persons endings are pronounced [ee]

In the plural, the -ent part of the -issent ending is silent. You pronounce [eess]

 

Grammar jargon

The infinitive of the verb is the unconjugated verb e.g. finir (to finish) as opposed to a conjugated form like je finis (I finish).

The stem of the infinitive is the part before the -er, -ir, or -re ending.

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Miranda finit de faire sa valise.
Miranda is finishing packing her suitcase.


Nous applaudissons les acteurs.
We're applauding the actors.


Nous répartissons les bonbons entre nous quatre.
We're dividing the sweets between the four of us.


Tu finis ton assiette ou pas de dessert.
You finish your plate or no dessert.


Tu rougis.
You're blushing.


Les enfants finissent l'école dans une heure.
The children finish school in an hour.


Sérieusement!?! Tu as le choix entre 365 jours, et tu choisis celui-là!!!
Seriously!?! You've got the choice between 365 days, and you pick this one!!!


Il agit prudemment.
He's acting carefully.


Vous finissez quand ?
When do you finish?



Je finis mes devoirs.
I finish my homework.


Nous finissons de décorer la pièce.
We finish decorating the room.


Elles choisissent leurs robes.
They're choosing their dresses.


Q&A

David

Kwiziq community member

10 July 2018

1 reply

Common exceptions

The lesson states "Most verbs ending -ir in Le Présent (Present Tense) conjugate like this:" but sortir, mentir and partir are very comon verbs endng in -ir that have a different rule so shouldn't the lesson discuss both groups smultaneously, otherwise a student gets misled until sometime later when the other is introduced with a similarly simplistic description.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

10 July 2018

10/07/18

Hi David,


This is a good point but in my experience this is how groups of verbs in learning French have always been taught.


You start off with the three groups of regular verbs and then you learn the exceptions and irregular verbs.


In time, you will be able to know which end in 


 'is, is, it, issons, issez, issent'


and learn the irregular ones each separately.


In my opinion the two most important verbs in that category are 'finir' and 'choisir', and you will get used to how they conjugate.


It might be reconforting to know that almost 90% of French verbs are those ending in ER ( according to Le Petit Robert), so by far the biggest group, and only 6% are verbs ending in IR...


Hope this helps!


 

Chris

Kwiziq community member

14 June 2018

1 reply

why is this in the plural and not the singular "Je finis mes devoirs."

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

15 June 2018

15/06/18

Hi Chris,


'Devoirs' in the plural is homework and 'devoir' in the singular is 'duty'.


e.g. Il a fait son devoir. He has done his duty.


Hope this helps!

Rant

Kwiziq community member

29 April 2018

1 reply

Note about répartir

The note about répartir in this lesson:

Note that the verb répartir is NOT a derivative of partir, but shares its root with the word repartition, and does follow the regular -IR conjugation.

Is a little confusing, because 'partir' is not mentioned anywhere, and there is a very subtle difference with 'repartir' that is also not mentioned. Having some of this context would help!

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

30 April 2018

30/04/18

Hi Rant,


I understand your confusion ..


The verb 'partir' isn't included because it is an irregular verb and does not conjugate like the regular verbs ending in IR, 'finir''choisir'  which go


" issons, issez, issent" in the plural forms BUT


je pars, tu pars, il/elle/on part, nous partons , vous partez, ils/elles partent.


Répartir however is a regular verb , and follow the regular verbs ending in IR conjugation rules.


Hopes this helps!


 


 

Ron

Kwiziq community member

21 October 2017

2 replies

Example sounds

Elles choisissent leurs robes. --> They're choosing their dresses. When I play the pronunciation for this phrase, it sounds like this: Elles choisissent sa robe. Is it possible that is what is being said, en erreur? Merci.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

24 November 2017

24/11/17

Since this question has not been responded to, please disregard it.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

19 March 2018

19/03/18

Hi Ron, 


I have listened to the example you mention and its pronunciation is correct. However, Gruff has the following to say about another point of pronunciation queried by a Kwiziq user which might explain a slight distortion:


 "We use state-of-the-art synthethic voices which are trained to speak using very large databases of experienced French natives narrating texts"


Hope this helps!


 

Jim

Kwiziq community member

21 October 2017

2 replies

Can't get the pronunciations to repeat.

Ron

Kwiziq community member

21 October 2017

21/10/17

Bonjour Jim,
I just listened to all of the phrase pronunciations and did not have an issue. I am quite certain the Kwiziq team will look into it for you.

Cécile

Kwiziq language super star

19 March 2018

19/03/18

Hi Jim,


I have checked on my laptop and didn't encounter a problem, could it be your device?


 


 

Amani

Kwiziq community member

1 January 2017

1 reply

why is it that

the conjugation is different from kwiziq's everywhere else it is like sortir or partir!!

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

3 January 2017

3/01/17

Bonjour Amani !

Regular -IR verbs are the ones following the conjugation of "finir", or as they're called in French "2nd group verbs". Every other -IR verb not following "finir" pattern are considered irregular, and belong to the 3rd group of conjugation in French.
Have a look at our related glossary articles:
https://kwiziq.learnfrenchwithalexa.com/revision/glossary/verb-conjugation-group/regular-ir-verbs-or-verbs-of-the-second-group
https://kwiziq.learnfrenchwithalexa.com/revision/glossary/verb-conjugation-group/most-verbs-ending-in-mir-tir-and-vir-conjugate-differently-from-finir

I hope that's helpful!
Bonne Année !

Kevin

Kwiziq community member

12 September 2016

1 reply

Thanks for including the pronunciation of the third person plural--those always throw me off!

Laura

Kwiziq language super star

12 September 2016

12/09/16

Happy to help! :-)

ann

Kwiziq community member

18 July 2016

1 reply

Miranda est en train de finir de faire sa valise (ou) Miranda est en train de faire sa valise?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

19 July 2016

19/07/16

Bonjour Ann !

Well, both sentences are correct in French, depending on you meaning "Miranda is finishing packing her suitcase" or "Miranda is packing her suitcase". The nuance is the same in French as in English.

À bientôt !
Thinking...