Conjugate dire (+avoir) in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)

In Passé composé, the verb dire (to say/to tell) and derivatives* have an irregular past participle: -dit, and uses the auxiliary avoir.

DIRE
 (to say/to tell)

j'

ai dit

tu

as dit

il / elle / on     

a dit

nous

avons di

vous

avez dit

ils/elles

ont dit

Here's the pattern to conjugate dire in Le Passé Composé :

avoir in Le Présent + dit 

 

Note that with avoir as an auxiliary, past participles never agree with the subject of the verb:

Il a dit un mensonge.
He said a lie.

Elle a dit un mensonge.
She said a lie.

*Other derivatives of dire follow the same conjugation:

redire (to say again) -> redit
prédire
 (to predict) -> prédit
interdire (to forbid) -> interdit
médire (to speak ill) -> médit 
contredire (to contradict) -> contredit
etc

Listen to these sentences:

Je n'ai jamais contredit Sam !
I never contradicted Sam!

Tu m'as redit la même chose !
You told me the same thing again!

Le directeur a interdit aux élèves d'y aller. 
The headmaster forbade the pupils to go there.

Nous avons prédit qu'il ne viendrait pas.
We predicted that he wouldn't come.

Vous avez médit de moi.
You spoke ill of me.

Les témoins ont contredit le suspect.
The witnesses contradicted the suspect.

 

Learn more about these related French grammar topics

Examples and resources

Elle a dit un mensonge.
She said a lie.


Le directeur a interdit aux élèves d'y aller. 
The headmaster forbade the pupils to go there.


Nous avons dit tout ce que nous savions à la police.
We told everything we knew to the police.


Il a dit un mensonge.
He said a lie.


Tu m'as redit la même chose !
You told me the same thing again!


Geoffrey a dit qu'il était d'accord.
Geoffrey said that he agreed.


Les témoins ont contredit le suspect.
The witnesses contradicted the suspect.


Je n'ai jamais contredit Sam !
I never contradicted Sam!


Qu'est-ce que tu lui as dit ?
What did you say to him?


Vous avez médit de moi.
You spoke ill of me.


Elles ont dit oui !
They said yes!


J'ai dit la vérité.
I told the truth.


Nous avons prédit qu'il ne viendrait pas.
We predicted that he wouldn't come.


Est-ce que vous avez dit merci ?
Did you say thanks?


Q&A

Steven

Kwiziq community member

28 March 2018

2 replies

Conjugate dire (+avoir) in Le Passé Composé (conversational past)

Following other answers, I'm much clearer but what is "an instance where the verb following «on» changes from the third persona singular to, usually, a plural tense and agrees correspondingly".

And, to be clear, when "on" = "we" it's still singular .... on a dit, here?

Aurélie

Kwiziq language super star

28 March 2018

28/03/18

Bonjour Steven !


I'm not sure of what rule you're referring to.
With "on", the conjugated verb is always in the 3rd singular person.
If you're referring to the past participle agreement, this only applies to cases with auxiliary "être", where agreement is required.
With verbs using "avoir" as auxiliary, the agreement with the subject never occurs.


I hope that's helpful!
Bonne journée !

Chris

Kwiziq community member

28 March 2018

28/03/18

Hi Steven, is your question about "on" meaning either "we" or an impersonal "one"?


Salut Marie! On va au cinéma ce soir? -- Are we going to the movies tonight?
Ça y est! On est arrivés! -- Finally! We have arrived!
Il y a presque 50 ans on est allé à la lune. -- It's almost 50 years ago that we went to the moon. (Here it is "allé" and not "allés" since the subject is an impersonal "one" rather than a personal group of "we".)


-- Chris (not a native speaker).

Jennifer

Kwiziq community member

9 September 2017

2 replies

On a dit la verité

Even when on means we, it is still conjugated as a singular person. I seem to think that sometimes it changes to a plural conjugation, is that when the verb is conjugated with être?

Ron

Kwiziq community member

10 September 2017

10/09/17

Bonjour Jennifer,
I believe that you are mixing two different lessons in this question. The word «on» has several meanings, one of which is «we», This use of "on" is for a specific group of people of which you're part: e.g. 'My friends and I'.
Here "on" is equivalent in meaning to "nous" (we).
Other meanings are: On : one/you/people
With these different usages, the conjugation following «on» is third person singular.
The only occasion where «être» is used is with a verb where the auxiliary is être which has nothing to do with «on».
As for the other part of your question, there is an instance where the verb following «on» changes from the third persona singular to, usually, a plural tense and agrees correspondingly. That however is independent of être unless the verb requires être as the auxiliary in the conjugation.
I hope you find this helpful.
Bonne chance.

Suzanne

Kwiziq community member

1 July 2018

1/07/18

Please give an example when a plural verb would follow on.


Clever stuff underway!