This is a question of the usage of French definite article “le”.

Kazuchika

Kwiziq community member

18 January 2019

2 replies

This is a question of the usage of French definite article “le”.

This is a question of the usage of French definite article “le”. I have encountered following two French sentences:

(1)  Il faut que vous puissiez parler français avant d’aller en France.

(2)  Pour apprandre le français, il faut que vous regardiez des films français.

As can be seen from these two sentences, you can notice that the phrase “ …parler français…”in the sentence (1) appears without the French definite article of “le”, but that the phrase “…apprandre le français…” in the sentence (2) appears with the French definite article of “le”.

Why doesn’t the definite article of “le” need in the sentence (1)?  And why does the definite article of “le” need in the sentence (2)?

Chris

Kwiziq community member

21 January 2019

21/01/19

In the first example, "parler français", français is used as an adverb and not as a noun. To see the difference in English you could use the following construction:

Je sais parler français. -- I can speak French. (français is used as an adverb here).Je sais parler le français. -- I can speak the French language (français is a noun here).

Kazuchika

Kwiziq community member

22 January 2019

22/01/19

Thank you very much for your kind answer. It's very interesting.

Your answer

Login to submit your answer

Don't have an account yet? Join today

Think you've got all the answers?

Test your French to the CEFR standard

find your French level »
4501questions9196answers160,823users
Clever stuff underway!