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Nominal rather than non-verbal

MelisaA2Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

Nominal rather than non-verbal

Using the term non-verbal here is very confusing, as it seems like you are saying it should only be written and not spoken. Perhaps you could change it to read nominal sentences? A nominal sentence is one without an expressed verb. It would avoid the confusion.

Asked 4 years ago
DarcyA2Kwiziq community member

The use of "non-verbal" in the results explanation is confusing. I thought it meant only to be used in written communication, but not spoken, which of course didn't make sense.

I did some research, and there is no such phrase as "non-verbal" in the English language (not to be confused with the homonym/homophone "nonverbal").

I looked into "nominal sentence" as well, and that doesn't quite apply either, because "not yet" has no subject, object, verb, or noun.

I finally found how to describe "not yet" linguistically. It is an an "adverbial phrase," as both words are used as adverbs in this case.

I think it would help clear up confusion for folks like me if you would consider replacing the use of "non-verbal" to the grammatically and linguistically correct phrase (though it was not easy to find, I'll admit!) 🙂

I love your site and am constantly improving because of the tests, lessons, and discussions.

Merci!

Darcy

DarcyA2Kwiziq community member

The use of "non-verbal" in the results explanation is confusing. I thought it meant only to be used in written communication, but not spoken, which of course didn't make sense.

I did some research, and there is no such phrase as "non-verbal" in the English language (not to be confused with the homonym/homophone "nonverbal").

I looked into "nominal sentence" as well, and that doesn't quite apply either, because "not yet" has no subject, object, verb, or noun.

I finally found how to describe "not yet" linguistically. It is an an "adverbial phrase," as both words are used as adverbs in this case.

I think it would help clear up confusion for folks like me if you would consider replacing the use of "non-verbal" to the grammatically and linguistically correct phrase (though it was not easy to find, I'll admit!) 🙂

I love your site and am constantly improving because of the tests, lessons, and discussions.

Merci!

Darcy

DarcyA2Kwiziq community member

The use of "non-verbal" in the results explanation is confusing. I thought it meant only to be used in written communication, but not spoken, which of course didn't make sense.

I did some research, and there is no such phrase as "non-verbal" in the English language (not to be confused with the homonym/homophone "nonverbal").

I looked into "nominal sentence" as well, and that doesn't quite apply either, because "not yet" has no subject, object, verb, or noun.

I finally found how to describe "not yet" linguistically. It is an an "adverbial phrase," as both words are used as adverbs in this case.

I think it would help clear up confusion for folks like me if you would consider replacing the use of "non-verbal" to the grammatically and linguistically correct phrase (though it was not easy to find, I'll admit!) 🙂

I love your site and am constantly improving because of the tests, lessons, and discussions.

Merci!

Darcy

DarcyA2Kwiziq community member

The use of "non-verbal" in the results explanation is confusing. I thought it meant only to be used in written communication, but not spoken, which of course didn't make sense.

I did some research, and there is no such phrase as "non-verbal" in the English language (not to be confused with the homonym/homophone "nonverbal").

I looked into "nominal sentence" as well, and that doesn't quite apply either, because "not yet" has no subject, object, verb, or noun.

I finally found how to describe "not yet" linguistically. It is an an "adverbial phrase," as both words are used as adverbs in this case.

I think it would help clear up confusion for folks like me if you would consider replacing the use of "non-verbal" to the grammatically and linguistically correct phrase (though it was not easy to find, I'll admit!) 🙂

I love your site and am constantly improving because of the tests, lessons, and discussions.

Merci!

Darcy

Melisa asked:View original

Nominal rather than non-verbal

Using the term non-verbal here is very confusing, as it seems like you are saying it should only be written and not spoken. Perhaps you could change it to read nominal sentences? A nominal sentence is one without an expressed verb. It would avoid the confusion.

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