j'ai hate que

WalterC1Kwiziq Q&A regular contributor

j'ai hate que

The online French-English dictionary translates "je ne peux pas attendre a" as "I can't wait to", with numerous examples, but you list only "j'ai hate que" as a translation for "I can't wait to".  Is there some difference between "j'ai hate" and "je ne peux pas attendre" in actual French usage?

Thanks.

Asked 8 months ago
CélineKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Walter,

Here are a few examples to illustrate the difference:

Je ne peux pas attendre = I can't wait -> meaning "I have to go right now"

Je ne peux pas attendre que (à) tu arrives I can't wait for you (to arrive) -> meaning "I have to go right now"

Je ne peux pas attendre à demain I can't wait for tomorrow -> meaning "I am so excited about tomorrow"

Je ne peux pas attendre à la maison = I can't wait at home -> meaning "I need to be wherever [sth] is happening etc"

 Avoir hâte que = To look forward to doing [sth] / can't wait for [sth] to happen

J'ai hâte que tu arrives I am looking forward to your arrival / I can't wait for you to arrive

Attention: attendre avec impatience

J'attends avec impatience ton arrivée = I am looking forward to your arrival

I hope this is helpful.

Bonne journée !

ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

It really depends on context. Avoir hâte usually means that someone is eager for something in a positive sense. Attendre à is a more neutral phrase; it doesn't have the positive connotation.

j'ai hate que

The online French-English dictionary translates "je ne peux pas attendre a" as "I can't wait to", with numerous examples, but you list only "j'ai hate que" as a translation for "I can't wait to".  Is there some difference between "j'ai hate" and "je ne peux pas attendre" in actual French usage?

Thanks.

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