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English Tenses

Virginia B2Kwiziq community member

English Tenses

I'll be right there in English is actually the use of the future continuous tense, as is I'll be there in two seconds.   I'll is a contraction of I WILL.
Not a good example for using the present tense in English. 
English teacher speaking here.

Asked 1 year ago
ChrisC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor Correct answer

@Virginia: Just to nit-pick a bit, "I'll be right there" is simple future tense in English, not continuous. Continuous future wouldn't make much sense, but it is "I'll be being right there".

AurélieKwiziq team memberCorrect answer

Bonjour Virginia !

I'm a bit confused by your message, and would love for you to clarify your point :)

This lesson is about the fact that while in English, we often use the simple future (I will be, I will do...) or the continuous present (I'm doing) to express the immediate future, in French we use the present. 

As Chris pointed out, the future continuous tense would be "I will be doing" in English.

Cordialement

JimC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

So top left of the lesson is where to "report a problem"

MaartenC1 Kwiziq Q&A super contributor

Not sure I understand - this is a lesson on the use of 'le présent' in French, in situations where English has a number of other ways of expressing immediate and near future actions, and doesn't tend to use 'simple present tense'.

It is not a lesson about English present tense and the English translations are not meant to reflect English present tense, but do reflect English expressions that may be used in the same context as the given French statement made in 'le présent'.

There are also other lessons on situations in which French uses present tense. French has only 1 present tense and 2 future tenses, with a near-future construction also in regular use. In English with four variants of present tense and 4 future tenses, there clearly cannot be one-to-one direct translation of tenses in all situations between English and French.

English Tenses

I'll be right there in English is actually the use of the future continuous tense, as is I'll be there in two seconds.   I'll is a contraction of I WILL.
Not a good example for using the present tense in English. 
English teacher speaking here.

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